The Christmas Star by Ace Collins (Review)

Robert Reed gave his life for his country in the early days of World War II. His sacrifice was honored when his widow and son were presented with the Congressional Medal of Honor. Each Christmas the final decoration Madge Reed hangs on the family’s tree is that medal. Rather than being a symbol of honor for young Jimmy Reed that shining star represents loss, pain, and suffering.

Yet a letter delivered by one of Robert’s fellow soldiers and a mystery posed in that letter put a father’s sacrifice and faith into perspective and bring new meaning to not just the star hanging on the Christmas tree but the events of the very first Christmas. Then, when least expected, a Christmas miracle turns a final bit of holiday sadness into a joy that the boy has never known.

The Author:

Ace Collins is the best-selling and award-winning author of more than 60 titles, including The Stories Behind The Best-Loved Songs of Christmas, Darkness Before Dawn, and Lassie: A Dog’s Life. Ace frequently speaks across the country and on radio and has appeared on national television shows, including Good Morning America, The Today Show, CNN, Fox and Friends, Entertainment Tonight, The Early Show and more. When not writing, he works as a magazine editor and graphic designer, as well as host for a charity organization radio and television broadcast. Ace and his wife, Kathy, are based in Arkadelphia, Arkansas.

Review:

First, the cover of THE CHRISTMAS STAR caught my eye. It is a beautiful cover and accurately sets up the time period of the book as well as setting the mood.

I enjoyed the story of Jimmy and his mom and their struggles, both with grief and for Jimmy, learning to cope with the loss of his father and then making decisions between right and wrong, and finally deciding his path in life. It is an endearing story and a perfect story for this time of year.

At times, the story lagged due to the descriptive narration the author used. I tend to enjoy a book more when I can use my imagination rather than read an in dept description of an object or scene. I like when an author sets the scene and moves on with the story. A story takes on a different meaning for the individual reading the book and describing conversations in detail (tones, emotions) does not allow the reader that option.

I think it is a good book and one many will enjoy. I am giving THE CHRISTMAS STAR four stars.

Purchase on Amazon: The Christmas Star